The Flood

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The Flood

The Flood is Katie Melua’s twelfth single from her 4th studio album ‘The House’.
It was released on the 17th May 2010 as a Digital download and was later released on CD on May 24th. There was also a limited edition release of a 7″ vinyl single.

The music video was directed by Kevin Godley – of ‘Godley and Creme’, who has also directed videos for Eric Clapton and U2, as well as having previously directed the video for Katie’s “Nine Million Bicycles”.
The video features Katie performing the song playing the piano on a spinning platform surrounded by male dancers.

Music critic Nick Levine gave the song a positive review stating – “Supremely elegant and subtly adventurous at the same time”.

Download Tracklist:

    1. The Flood (Radio Edit)
    2. The Flood (Danny Kirsch Radio Edit)
    3. The Flood (Michael Woods Remix)
    4. The Flood (Jakwob Remix)
    5. The Flood Aid (DJ Vata Mashup)

CD Tracklist:

    1. The Flood (Radio Edit)
    2. The Flood (Album Version)
    3. The One I Love is Gone

Buying Options

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Release Year: 2010 | Cat: Dramatico DRAMCDS0058

Promo Video

CD Booklet Text:

The Flood

The Flood (Radio Edit)
The Flood (Album Version)
The One I Love is Gone

Writers
Tracks 1 & 2 Katie Melua/Guy Chambers/Lauren Christy
Track 3 Bill Monroe

Publishers
Tracks 1 & 2 Melua Music Ltd/Sony/ATV Music Publishing (UK)Ltd,
EMI Music Publishing, Careers/Lauren Christy Songs (BMI) o/b/o/ Lauren Christy
Track 3 Kentucky Music Inc/Carlin Music Corp

℗ & © 2010 Dramatico Entertainment Ltd.

DRAMCDS0058

www.dramatico.com

01. The Flood

Broken people get recycled
And I hope that I will.
Sometimes we’re thrown off our pathways
What I thought was my way home
Wasn’t the place I know
I’m certain nothing’s certain
What we own becomes our prison
My possessions will be gone
Back to where they came from

Blame, no one is to blame
As natural as the rain that falls
Here comes the Flood again

See the rock that you hold onto
Is it gonna save you
When the earth begins to crumble?
Why d’you feel you have to hold on?
Imagine if you let go

Blame, no one is to blame
As natural as the rain that falls
Here comes the Flood again

Wash away the weight that pulls you down
Ride the waves that free you from the dusk?

Don’t trust your eyes
Its easy to believe them
Know in your heart
That you can leave your prison

Don’t trust your mind
It’s not always listening
Turn on the lights
And feel the ancient rhythm

Don’t trust your eyes
Its easy to believe them
Know in your heart
That you can leave your prison

Blame, no one is to blame
As natural as the rain that falls
Here comes the Flood again

02. The One I Love Is Gone

I don’t know, I don’t know
Where I’ll go or what I’ll do
It makes no difference what I do without you

Oh I love you my darling
But I’ll have to let you leave
Goodbye it’s the last you’ll hear of me

Well I found the bluebird
High on a mountainside
And the little bird would sing its little song

So I’ll sigh, I’ll cry

I’ll even wanna die
For the one I love is gone.

Well I found the bluebird
High on a mountainside
And the little bird would sing its little song

So I’ll sigh, I’ll cry
I’ll even wanna die
For the one I love is gone.

I’ll sigh, I’ll cry
I’ll even wanna die
For the one I love is gone.

Rating: ★★★★☆
DigitalSpy.co.uk

“No, I’m not afraid of changing,” Katie Melua sings on the first verse of ‘The Flood’ – and there’s no doubting her sincerity. Having cut loose from her musical mentor, Mike ‘Remember You’re A Womble’ Batt, her upcoming album, The House, finds her teaming up with trendy electro producer William Orbit and co-writing with Guy Chambers, Lauren Christy from The Matrix and Polly Scattergood. Not unsurprisingly, this lead single has nothing whatsoever to do with the number of pedal-driven vehicles in an over-populated Chinese city.

Instead, it’s an optimistic paean to the power of, well, change. “When the world begins to crumble, why’d you feel you have to hold on?” Melua inquires, before goading: “Imagine if you let go…” Musically, ‘The Flood’ is no less intriguing, beginning as an atmospheric, Middle Eastern-tinged pop ballad before morphing into something altogether sprightlier after a surprising mid-song tempo change. The result? Supremely elegant and subtly adventurous at the same time, suggesting Melua snipped those apron strings at precisely the right time.